Balloon Blow Up Games

You are going to need some lung capacity for some of these balloon blow up games! Blowing up balloons isn't as easy as it looks. And especially in the "heat of battle!" But they sure are fun and make lots of noise.

Here's a tip.  If you stretch out the balloon by pulling with both hands before you begin to blow it up, the easier it is get air inside on the first couple puffs. I like to use the twelve inch (12") balloons while playing these games. They are a little bigger and most likely will not be blown up within a short period of time. You want the fun to last as long as possible. Plus, it gives you more time to snap some wonderful pictures of the event. The smaller balloons pop more readily within the times set for most of these games.

Remember when playing blow up games, it is likely that the balloon will pop while doing so. In fact, the games involve popping the balloon.  S be sure to play these games with children that do not frighten easily and understand the concept of the popping balloons, noise and all that come with it. The games on this page are not for younger players, although they are fun to watch by the younger crowd.  Popping balloons is such fin and seeing them popped can also be entertaining.

Balloon Safety Tips

We thought it best to put a few safety tips here on the balloon blow up game page.

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) warns parents and guardians of young children about the suffocation hazard presented by uninflated toy balloons and pieces of broken balloons.

Of all children's products, balloons are the leading cause of suffocation death, according to CPSC injury data. Since 1973, more than 110 children have died as a result of suffocation involving uninflated balloons or pieces of balloons. Most of the victims were under six years of age, but the CPSC does know of several older children who have suffocated on balloons.

Accidents involving balloons tend to occur in two ways.

Some children have sucked uninflated balloons into their mouths, often while attempting to inflate them. This can occur when a child who is blowing up the balloon inhales or takes a breath to prepare for the next blow, and draws the balloon back into the mouth and throat.

Some deaths may have resulted when children swallowed uninflated balloons they were sucking or chewing on. The CPSC knows of one case in which a child was chewing on an uninflated balloon when she fell from a swing. The child hit the ground and, in a reflex action, inhaled sharply. She suffocated on the balloon.

The second kind of accident involves balloon pieces. Children have drawn pieces of broken balloons that they were playing with into their throats.

If a balloon breaks and is not discarded, for example, some children may continue to play with it, chewing on pieces of the balloon or attempting to stretch it across their mouths and suck or blow bubbles in it. These balloon pieces are easily sucked into the throat and lungs. Balloons mold to the throat and lungs and can completely block breathing.

Because of the danger of suffocation, the CPSC recommends that parents and guardians do not allow children under the age of eight to play with uninflated balloons without supervision.

The CPSC does not believe that a completely inflated balloon presents a hazard to young children. If the balloon breaks, however, CPSC recommends that parents immediately collect the pieces of the broken balloon and dispose of them out of the reach of young children.

Have fun and be safe while playing these balloon blow up games.

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